Robert Wilson (1806 – 1888)

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{Robert Wilson (ship captain) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Robert Wilson black and white image of Robert Wilson with beard Born 1806 Ireland Died 1888 Occupation Ship Captain Known for Helping escaped slaves to freedom Robert Wilson (1806 – 1888)[1] was a Great Lakes ship captain operating out of Oakville, Ontario who helped black slaves escape to freedom as part of the Underground Railroad.[2]

Wilson was born in Ireland. His mother moved the family to Canada in 1817 after the death of her husband.[3]

Wilson was the master of the Lady Colborne, a schooner that shipped grain on the Great Lakes.[4] Slaves would be picked up from Ashtabula, Ohio and hidden in the hold with grain shipments.[5][6] Following the American Civil War, African Americans in the Oakville area celebrated Emancipation Day at George's Square in the town, and would also visit the home of Wilson.[6][7] The home at 279 Lawson St. was known as the "Mariner's Home" as it was open to ill and homeless sailors during the winter.[8]

The Captain R. Wilson Public School is named in his honour.[9][10]

References

"Captain Robert Wilson, 1806-1888". images.oakville.halinet.on.ca. Archived from the original on 2009-11-30. Retrieved 30 November 2009.
Lerech, Deborah. "The Underground Railroad". oakvilletrails.ca. Town of Oakville. Archived from the original on 2009-11-30. Retrieved 30 November 2009.
"Mariners' Home - 1862 (279 Lawson Street)". Oakville Historical Society. Archived from the original on 2009-11-30. Retrieved 30 November 2009.
"History of Houses from Old Oakville". oakvillelra.ca. Oakville Lakeside Residents Association. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-11-30. Retrieved 30 November 2009.
Winks, Robin W. (1997). The Blacks in Canada: a history. McGill-Queen's Press. p. 245. ISBN 978-0-7735-1632-8. Retrieved 2009-11-30.
Vogt, Roy (1999). Whose Property?: The Deepening Conflict Between Private Property and Democracy in Canada. University of Toronto Press. p. 374. ISBN 978-0-8020-8186-5. Retrieved 2009-11-30.
"Underground Railway to Oakville". ccah.ca. Canadian Caribbean Association of Halton. 2006-03-30. Archived from the original on 2009-11-30. Retrieved 30 November 2009.
"Name for new school has foundation in Oakville's history". Oakville Beaver. Metroland Media Group. 2004-04-02. p. 7. Retrieved 30 November 2009.
"About Captain R. Wilson". Halton District School Board. Archived from the original on 2009-11-30. Retrieved 30 November 2009.
"What's In A Name?". Halton District School Board. Archived from the original on 2009-11-30. Retrieved 30 November 2009.

Wilson was the master of the Lady Colborne, a schooner that shipped grain on the Great Lakes.<ref>Template:Cite web</ref> Slaves would be picked up from Ashtabula, Ohio and hidden in the hold with grain shipments.<ref name="Winks">Template:Cite book</ref><ref name="Vogt">Template:Cite book</ref> Following the American Civil War, African Americans in the Oakville area celebrated Emancipation Day at George's Square in the town, and would also visit the home of Wilson.<ref name="Vogt" /><ref>Template:Cite web</ref> The home at 279 Lawson St. was known as the "Mariner's Home" as it was open to ill and homeless sailors during the winter.<ref>Template:Cite news</ref>

The Captain R. Wilson Public School is named in his honour.<ref>Template:Cite web</ref><ref>Template:Cite web</ref>

References

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